Installing of an uiAccess applicaiton is not so easy and requires several steps to take.

Downloading the package

Goal: obtain the irght package
First of all, download the right package. Go to the project page and click the Downloads tab:
installing_the_module_0001.jpg
There, you need to download the package that is called as ‘UIAutomation X.Y.Z for Metro testing’ (of the latest version, of cource):
installing_the_module_0002.jpg
Download the package with name like ‘UIAutomation.X.Y.Z.for.Metro.testing.zip’.

Unblocking the package (optional)

You may want to unblock the package itself (in case that your operating system's settings prevent you from taking the following steps). This does not unblock the content.
installing_the_module_0002_1.jpg
The properties of an archive that was unblocked look like:
installing_the_module_0002_2.jpg

Unpacking

Goal: get files
Open the package. Don’t put the content directly to the %ProgramFiles% folder! It won’t work. Security has been tightened even more (and it’s a good news for us), so that we need to do some preparations.
Open the package where it was saved (supposedly, in your Downloads folder):
installing_the_module_0003.jpg
Unpack the zip into your user’s folder, for example, Documents. I created the folder ‘Metro’ and paste the files to there. Open properties of dlls:
installing_the_module_0004.jpg
Now, you need to unblock the binaries one by one:
installing_the_module_0005.jpg

Putting module files into a secure location

Goal: put files from the package to a place where they would work unless you have changed the policy
Eventually, you can copy all the files to a folder within the ‘Program Files’ hierarchy (one of possible secure locations, called here protected locations). If you had not unblocked the binaries, or tried to unblock in the ‘Program Files’ folder, your output in PowerShell console would look like that:
installing_the_module_00061.jpg
If you did all I wrote above, you output will be much cleaner:
installing_the_module_0007.jpg

Importing the certificate

Goal: as only applications signed with recognizable certificate could work with uiAccess, you need to import the certificate that shipped with the package
With the package, you've got a certificate. You need to install it. Alternatively, you can sign UIAutomationSpy.exe with the certificate you possibly have.
If you have no your own certificate, below are screenshots showing how to use the certificate from the package. Run certmgr, for example, from cmd.exe, or from the Start Screen
importing_the_certificate_001.jpg
and follow the pictures:
importing_the_certificate_01.jpg
importing_the_certificate_02.jpg
importing_the_certificate_03.jpg
importing_the_certificate_04.jpg
importing_the_certificate_05.jpg
importing_the_certificate_06.jpg
importing_the_certificate_07.jpg

Changing the policy (as alternative to using a secure location)

Goal: to work with module files where you'd like to
After you installed the certificate and the application in the secure location (you might set the policy not to require this if you’d like to), you can run the application. If you want to change the policy, run gpedit.msc, for example, from the Start screen
importing_the_certificate_002.jpg
and set the following setting:
importing_the_certificate_003.jpg
importing_the_certificate_004.jpg
After you’ve finished, reload policies:
importing_the_certificate_005.jpg
For the first test, just run the application, agree with UAC and manually run the Start screen by pressing the Win button. Now you should see something like on the picture below:
importing_the_certificate_09.jpg
On the picture, UIAutomationSpy shows the code for the Mail tile. It is bordered with the red rectangle. All that I’d like to offer is to explore tiles:
importing_the_certificate_10.jpg
This is a text box, Edit in terms of UIAutomation.

Last edited Feb 4, 2013 at 8:41 AM by xinliu, version 7

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